Discussion:
MS-DOS aux file -- what that is??
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luserdroog
2021-07-06 00:30:11 UTC
Permalink
I've been reading up on MS-DOS programming and the various file functions
as they evolved from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0 from Norton's Guide to the IBM PC.
In the DOS 2.0 functions there are 5 file handles already opened and reserved.

0 = stdin
1 = stdout
2 = stderr
3 = stdaux
4 = stdprint

What in the heck is a "standard auxiliary file (or device?)"? Is there any lore
on what this was used for? Would you plug an extra gizmo into the computer
and install a device driver and hook it up as the aux file and do what ...
blinkenlights, 7 segment displays, warp coil polarity control?
Carlos E.R.
2021-07-06 01:04:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by luserdroog
I've been reading up on MS-DOS programming and the various file functions
as they evolved from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0 from Norton's Guide to the IBM PC.
In the DOS 2.0 functions there are 5 file handles already opened and reserved.
0 = stdin
1 = stdout
2 = stderr
3 = stdaux
4 = stdprint
What in the heck is a "standard auxiliary file (or device?)"? Is there any lore
on what this was used for? Would you plug an extra gizmo into the computer
and install a device driver and hook it up as the aux file and do what ...
blinkenlights, 7 segment displays, warp coil polarity control?
It was the serial port, by default.
--
Cheers, Carlos.
Juergen Nickelsen
2021-07-08 16:01:37 UTC
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"Carlos E.R." <***@es.invalid> writes:

[AUX:]
Post by Carlos E.R.
It was the serial port, by default.
And there was a MODE command to set the port parameters (among other
things), so this could actually be useful.
--
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massive, difficult to redirect, awe-inspiring, entertaining, and a
source of mindboggling amounts of excrement when you least expect
it. -- Gene Spafford
Ted Nolan <tednolan>
2021-07-08 16:13:32 UTC
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Post by Juergen Nickelsen
[AUX:]
Post by Carlos E.R.
It was the serial port, by default.
And there was a MODE command to set the port parameters (among other
things), so this could actually be useful.
Except it still wasn't useful because DOS didn't use interrupts to
drive the UART iirc. You still needed a program that could do that
directly to get any useful speed out of the com port, and that bypassed
the whole AUX: interface entirely.
--
columbiaclosings.com
What's not in Columbia anymore..
J. Clarke
2021-07-06 01:58:43 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 5 Jul 2021 17:30:11 -0700 (PDT), luserdroog
Post by luserdroog
I've been reading up on MS-DOS programming and the various file functions
as they evolved from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0 from Norton's Guide to the IBM PC.
In the DOS 2.0 functions there are 5 file handles already opened and reserved.
0 = stdin
1 = stdout
2 = stderr
3 = stdaux
4 = stdprint
What in the heck is a "standard auxiliary file (or device?)"? Is there any lore
on what this was used for? Would you plug an extra gizmo into the computer
and install a device driver and hook it up as the aux file and do what ...
blinkenlights, 7 segment displays, warp coil polarity control?
My guess would the audio recorder, which on the PC wasn't used to
record sound but as an I/O device.
luserdroog
2021-07-06 03:01:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 5 Jul 2021 17:30:11 -0700 (PDT), luserdroog
Post by luserdroog
I've been reading up on MS-DOS programming and the various file functions
as they evolved from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0 from Norton's Guide to the IBM PC.
In the DOS 2.0 functions there are 5 file handles already opened and reserved.
0 = stdin
1 = stdout
2 = stderr
3 = stdaux
4 = stdprint
What in the heck is a "standard auxiliary file (or device?)"? Is there any lore
on what this was used for? Would you plug an extra gizmo into the computer
and install a device driver and hook it up as the aux file and do what ...
blinkenlights, 7 segment displays, warp coil polarity control?
My guess would the audio recorder, which on the PC wasn't used to
record sound but as an I/O device.
Interesting. Do you a need a modem in there somewhere or A/D or D/A convertors?
Grant Taylor
2021-07-06 04:56:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by luserdroog
Interesting. Do you a need a modem in there somewhere or A/D or D/A convertors?
The original IBM PC included a Cassette port.

Link - Nobody ever used the IBM PC with cassette tape port.
-

--
Grant. . . .
unix || die
Bob Eager
2021-07-06 11:11:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by luserdroog
I've been reading up on MS-DOS programming and the various file
functions as they evolved from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0 from Norton's Guide to
the IBM PC.
In the DOS 2.0 functions there are 5 file handles already opened and reserved.
0 = stdin 1 = stdout 2 = stderr 3 = stdaux 4 = stdprint
What in the heck is a "standard auxiliary file (or device?)"? Is there
any lore on what this was used for? Would you plug an extra gizmo into
the computer and install a device driver and hook it up as the aux file
and do what ... blinkenlights, 7 segment displays, warp coil polarity
control?
My guess would the audio recorder, which on the PC wasn't used to record
sound but as an I/O device.
No, it was the first serial port. The AUX: device.
--
Using UNIX since v6 (1975)...

Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
Carlos E.R.
2021-07-06 11:15:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On Mon, 5 Jul 2021 17:30:11 -0700 (PDT), luserdroog
Post by luserdroog
I've been reading up on MS-DOS programming and the various file functions
as they evolved from 1.0 to 2.0 to 3.0 from Norton's Guide to the IBM PC.
In the DOS 2.0 functions there are 5 file handles already opened and reserved.
0 = stdin
1 = stdout
2 = stderr
3 = stdaux
4 = stdprint
What in the heck is a "standard auxiliary file (or device?)"? Is there any lore
on what this was used for? Would you plug an extra gizmo into the computer
and install a device driver and hook it up as the aux file and do what ...
blinkenlights, 7 segment displays, warp coil polarity control?
My guess would the audio recorder, which on the PC wasn't used to
record sound but as an I/O device.
Nope, sorry. The tape recorder thing wasn't a device, not a pseudo file
you could write to.

No, AUX was the serial port.
--
Cheers, Carlos.
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