Discussion:
New Programmer's Drink?
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Quadibloc
2021-11-19 19:13:23 UTC
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I remember long, long ago that Pepsi had an advertising jingle on the
radio (I even seem to remember that it was the "first" such jingle,
but I won't stand by that statement. Maybe someone knows.). It
Pepsi Cola hits the spot!
Twelve full ounces that's a lot!
Twice as much for a nickel too,
Pepsi Cola is the drink for you!
You can even hear it on YouTube:



John Savard
Mike Spencer
2021-11-20 02:38:39 UTC
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Permalink
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole new
entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now. They're
a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.

Circa 1990, I was reading the ingredients label on the can of
some"energy drink" that I'd never before heard of and it included
phosphoric acid. Since then, I spotted it in other drinks.

I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Fred Smith
2021-11-20 04:49:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole new
entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now. They're
a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
And its reputation as a contraceptive douche?
Charlie Gibbs
2021-11-20 19:08:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fred Smith
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole new
entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now. They're
a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
I remember seeing shows set around 1900 where a boy would take a girl
down to the soda fountain for a strawberry phosphate. That's about
the only reference that I remember.

And there was the myth where if you left a penny in a glass of Coca-Cola
overnight it would dissolve.
Post by Fred Smith
And its reputation as a contraceptive douche?
Reminds me of a scene from _Deep Throat_...
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | Microsoft is a dictatorship.
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | Apple is a cult.
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | Linux is anarchy.
/ \ if you read it the right way. | Pick your poison.
Radey Shouman
2021-11-22 15:13:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Charlie Gibbs
Post by Fred Smith
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole new
entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now. They're
a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
I remember seeing shows set around 1900 where a boy would take a girl
down to the soda fountain for a strawberry phosphate. That's about
the only reference that I remember.
The ingredients are still available, should you want to try making one
at home. I have not.

https://shop.artofdrink.com/product/acid-phosphate/
Post by Charlie Gibbs
And there was the myth where if you left a penny in a glass of Coca-Cola
overnight it would dissolve.
Post by Fred Smith
And its reputation as a contraceptive douche?
Reminds me of a scene from _Deep Throat_...
--
Scott Lurndal
2021-11-22 16:13:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Radey Shouman
Post by Charlie Gibbs
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole new
entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now. They're
a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
I remember seeing shows set around 1900 where a boy would take a girl
down to the soda fountain for a strawberry phosphate. That's about
the only reference that I remember.
The ingredients are still available, should you want to try making one
at home. I have not.
https://shop.artofdrink.com/product/acid-phosphate/
And it's from the "Extinct Chemical Company". Clever.
Andy Burns
2021-11-23 19:35:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Radey Shouman
The ingredients are still available, should you want to try making one
at home. I have not.
https://shop.artofdrink.com/product/acid-phosphate/
From reading that label, it sounds like it should contain extract of snake ...
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-11-20 10:29:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole
new entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now.
They're a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
I recall an aunt tell of doing dental assistant work, maybe in Canada?
where the dentist would have a glass of cola and put an extracted tooth
in it to demonstrate it's disolving properties. (But I think it would
still take a fortnight to disolve?)
Post by Mike Spencer
Circa 1990, I was reading the ingredients label on the can of
some"energy drink" that I'd never before heard of and it included
phosphoric acid. Since then, I spotted it in other drinks.
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you feel
about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!)
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
D.J.
2021-11-20 18:10:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:29:35 +0000, "Kerr-Mudd, John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole
new entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now.
They're a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
I recall an aunt tell of doing dental assistant work, maybe in Canada?
where the dentist would have a glass of cola and put an extracted tooth
in it to demonstrate it's disolving properties. (But I think it would
still take a fortnight to disolve?)
Post by Mike Spencer
Circa 1990, I was reading the ingredients label on the can of
some"energy drink" that I'd never before heard of and it included
phosphoric acid. Since then, I spotted it in other drinks.
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you feel
about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!)
There were people freaking out over flourides in the drinking water
once place I lived... then it was pointed out they were naturally
there, and part of the water from the artesian wells that were used
for water in town.
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-11-20 20:28:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 12:10:19 -0600
Post by D.J.
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:29:35 +0000, "Kerr-Mudd, John"
[]
Post by D.J.
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you
feel about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!
)
There were people freaking out over flourides in the drinking water
I had that problem, but I decided flouride might make it a bit doughy!
Post by D.J.
once place I lived... then it was pointed out they were naturally
there, and part of the water from the artesian wells that were used
for water in town.
Like there's no place (hardly; maybe except inside a thick lead box?)
you can't get some dose of radiation (hopefully very very low).
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
J. Clarke
2021-11-20 22:36:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D.J.
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:29:35 +0000, "Kerr-Mudd, John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole
new entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now.
They're a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
I recall an aunt tell of doing dental assistant work, maybe in Canada?
where the dentist would have a glass of cola and put an extracted tooth
in it to demonstrate it's disolving properties. (But I think it would
still take a fortnight to disolve?)
Post by Mike Spencer
Circa 1990, I was reading the ingredients label on the can of
some"energy drink" that I'd never before heard of and it included
phosphoric acid. Since then, I spotted it in other drinks.
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you feel
about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!)
There were people freaking out over flourides in the drinking water
once place I lived... then it was pointed out they were naturally
there, and part of the water from the artesian wells that were used
for water in town.
I read somewhere that that's how the benefits of fluorides were
discovered--there were communities with unusually good teeth and
nobody could figure out what they were doing differently until the
analyzed the water.
Mike Spencer
2021-11-21 06:01:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by D.J.
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:29:35 +0000, "Kerr-Mudd, John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400
Post by Mike Spencer
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you feel
about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!)
There were people freaking out over flourides in the drinking water
once place I lived... then it was pointed out they were naturally
there, and part of the water from the artesian wells that were used
for water in town.
With a degree in chemistry (albeit 50 years old) the notion of
ingesting fluoride offends me but I'm willing to depend on the
established science and the failure of widespread fluoridation to
engender mass health calamities once millions of people were exposed
to it. I'm less trusting of the unbending assertion that amalgam
fillings pose no health risk whetever.

Much less happy with the presence of arsenic in drilled wells in this
area. Old hand-dug surface wells mostly don't have the problem while
drilled wells pierce and draw water from the gold/arsenic-bearing strata.

It's all in paying attention to detail. Back in my chemistry days, I
read about a case of cattle somewhere in the US west that were dying.
A study revealed that the soil was cobalt-free and they were dying of
cobalt deficiency. So ranchers salted the range with cobalt. The
cattle continued to die. A second study revealed that they were dying
of cobalt poisoning. Seems that what was needed was something like (I
forget the acutual numbers) 10 gm of soluble cobalt evenly distributed
over each square mile of range while the ranchers were spreading it
like they did fertilizer or weed killer.

Attention to details.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
J. Clarke
2021-11-21 16:26:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 21 Nov 2021 02:01:00 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by D.J.
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:29:35 +0000, "Kerr-Mudd, John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400
Post by Mike Spencer
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you feel
about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!)
There were people freaking out over flourides in the drinking water
once place I lived... then it was pointed out they were naturally
there, and part of the water from the artesian wells that were used
for water in town.
With a degree in chemistry (albeit 50 years old) the notion of
ingesting fluoride offends me but I'm willing to depend on the
established science and the failure of widespread fluoridation to
engender mass health calamities once millions of people were exposed
to it. I'm less trusting of the unbending assertion that amalgam
fillings pose no health risk whetever.
Does anybody use amalgam fillings anymore?
Post by Mike Spencer
Much less happy with the presence of arsenic in drilled wells in this
area. Old hand-dug surface wells mostly don't have the problem while
drilled wells pierce and draw water from the gold/arsenic-bearing strata.
It's all in paying attention to detail. Back in my chemistry days, I
read about a case of cattle somewhere in the US west that were dying.
A study revealed that the soil was cobalt-free and they were dying of
cobalt deficiency. So ranchers salted the range with cobalt. The
cattle continued to die. A second study revealed that they were dying
of cobalt poisoning. Seems that what was needed was something like (I
forget the acutual numbers) 10 gm of soluble cobalt evenly distributed
over each square mile of range while the ranchers were spreading it
like they did fertilizer or weed killer.
Attention to details.
D.J.
2021-11-21 18:38:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 21 Nov 2021 02:01:00 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
Post by D.J.
On Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:29:35 +0000, "Kerr-Mudd, John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400
Post by Mike Spencer
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
Best not to keep it in your mouth for a fortnight. But how do you feel
about fl[u]oride? (Oops, could be a heated discussion coming up!)
There were people freaking out over flourides in the drinking water
once place I lived... then it was pointed out they were naturally
there, and part of the water from the artesian wells that were used
for water in town.
With a degree in chemistry (albeit 50 years old) the notion of
ingesting fluoride offends me but I'm willing to depend on the
established science and the failure of widespread fluoridation to
engender mass health calamities once millions of people were exposed
to it. I'm less trusting of the unbending assertion that amalgam
fillings pose no health risk whetever.
I had some amalgam filling from my younger days. Im IS navyboot camp,
they just scooped out one tooth and filled it with amalgam. When I had
a good health plan, I asked for that to be removed... the dentist said
they weren't a problem. I pointed out politely I was willing to try a
different dentist office. They did 'find' a cavity or two in those
teeth, and made the changes.

I do feel better. That dental work where that was removed, was back in
the 1980s/1990s. I have insisted on no amalgam since then.

No idea if this is an actual effect or not, but since then my
relatives have said I look healthier.
Post by Mike Spencer
Much less happy with the presence of arsenic in drilled wells in this
area. Old hand-dug surface wells mostly don't have the problem while
drilled wells pierce and draw water from the gold/arsenic-bearing strata.
There was a Boy Scount summer camp out in Texas that had drilled down
to get water for the camp. It contained sulphur. They had to install a
reverse osmosis system to clean out the sulphur, then they added in
chlorine. At least that is my memory of it. I know when the water
purification failed, the water smelled of sulphur compunds.

They told us it wasn't bad for us, and it would keep the mosquitoes
away. Well, my personal experience is it lessened the number of
mosquitoes that buzzed around me head. Not all of them.
Post by Mike Spencer
It's all in paying attention to detail. Back in my chemistry days, I
read about a case of cattle somewhere in the US west that were dying.
A study revealed that the soil was cobalt-free and they were dying of
cobalt deficiency. So ranchers salted the range with cobalt. The
cattle continued to die. A second study revealed that they were dying
of cobalt poisoning. Seems that what was needed was something like (I
forget the acutual numbers) 10 gm of soluble cobalt evenly distributed
over each square mile of range while the ranchers were spreading it
like they did fertilizer or weed killer.
Attention to details.
Yeah, over do it.
--
Jim
Joy Beeson
2021-11-22 00:58:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 21 Nov 2021 02:01:00 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
I'm less trusting of the unbending assertion that amalgam
fillings pose no health risk whetever.
If I recall correctly, the assertion is that leaving amalgam fillings
in place poses less health risk than drilling them out.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Maus
2021-11-23 08:58:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
On 21 Nov 2021 02:01:00 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
I'm less trusting of the unbending assertion that amalgam
fillings pose no health risk whetever.
If I recall correctly, the assertion is that leaving amalgam fillings
in place poses less health risk than drilling them out.
+++

I keep my teeth in a glass beside the bed now.
--
***@mail.com
That's not a mousehole!
Charlie Gibbs
2021-11-22 17:05:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Spencer
It's all in paying attention to detail. Back in my chemistry days, I
read about a case of cattle somewhere in the US west that were dying.
A study revealed that the soil was cobalt-free and they were dying of
cobalt deficiency. So ranchers salted the range with cobalt. The
cattle continued to die. A second study revealed that they were dying
of cobalt poisoning. Seems that what was needed was something like (I
forget the acutual numbers) 10 gm of soluble cobalt evenly distributed
over each square mile of range while the ranchers were spreading it
like they did fertilizer or weed killer.
What? You mean more isn't always better? My faith is shaken...
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | Microsoft is a dictatorship.
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | Apple is a cult.
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | Linux is anarchy.
/ \ if you read it the right way. | Pick your poison.
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
2021-11-22 18:15:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 22 Nov 2021 17:05:35 GMT
Post by Charlie Gibbs
What? You mean more isn't always better? My faith is shaken...
Less is the new more viz:

$ ls -i /usr/bin/less /usr/bin/more
68568 /usr/bin/less 68568 /usr/bin/more
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith
Odds and Ends at http://www.sohara.org/
Maus
2021-11-23 09:05:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Charlie Gibbs
Post by Mike Spencer
It's all in paying attention to detail. Back in my chemistry days, I
read about a case of cattle somewhere in the US west that were dying.
A study revealed that the soil was cobalt-free and they were dying of
cobalt deficiency. So ranchers salted the range with cobalt. The
cattle continued to die. A second study revealed that they were dying
of cobalt poisoning. Seems that what was needed was something like (I
forget the acutual numbers) 10 gm of soluble cobalt evenly distributed
over each square mile of range while the ranchers were spreading it
like they did fertilizer or weed killer.
What? You mean more isn't always better? My faith is shaken...
When I was a farmer, I read the story of a farmer who hired someone to
spread a trace element on one field, the farmer walked up to the field
to check the job was done, and clover sprouthed on where the tiny
amount of dust was left as he walked away.

A local golf course had a new lawn manager, who spread something on the
greens which caused them to change color to deep purple. Their lease on
the land was conditional on their not spreading any. I never heard the
end of the story.
--
***@mail.com
That's not a mousehole!
Quadibloc
2021-11-26 03:37:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
I recall an aunt tell of doing dental assistant work, maybe in Canada?
where the dentist would have a glass of cola and put an extracted tooth
in it to demonstrate it's disolving properties. (But I think it would
still take a fortnight to disolve?)
No, overnight will do it.

John Savard
D.J.
2021-11-20 18:07:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 19 Nov 2021 22:38:39 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
What I'm basically getting at is, is this renamed Jolt or a whole new
entity in the caffeine wars?
Double your caffeine, double your fun...
Jolt is still around.
There are plenty of soft drinks with extra caffeine around now. They're
a whole new product genre, called "energy drinks".
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
Circa 1990, I was reading the ingredients label on the can of
some"energy drink" that I'd never before heard of and it included
phosphoric acid. Since then, I spotted it in other drinks.
I use phosphoric acid to clean my hand-forged ironwork.
Dentistry be damned, eh?
I remember watching older movies from the 1940s as a kid, and them
talking about a Coke Cola float with that phosphate fizz.
Scott Lurndal
2021-11-21 15:30:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Spencer
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
Checks cherry coke can at hand:

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup,
Carmel Color, PHOSPHORIC ACID, Natural Flavors.
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
2021-11-21 16:27:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:30:21 GMT
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Mike Spencer
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup,
Carmel Color, PHOSPHORIC ACID, Natural Flavors.
I didn't have any to hand so I went and looked on Coca-Cola's web
site where the ingredients are listed and include phosphoric acid with the
explanation that it is responsible for the tart flavour.
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith
Odds and Ends at http://www.sohara.org/
Maus
2021-11-23 08:56:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Mike Spencer
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup,
Carmel Color, PHOSPHORIC ACID, Natural Flavors.
There may be other stuff in there. There was an argument fairly
recently between the Bolivian government and coca-cola about what what
the bolivians got for the coca leaves that the us company bought from
them.
--
***@mail.com
That's not a mousehole!
Scott Lurndal
2021-11-23 14:27:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Maus
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Mike Spencer
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup,
Carmel Color, PHOSPHORIC ACID, Natural Flavors.
There may be other stuff in there. There was an argument fairly
recently between the Bolivian government and coca-cola about what what
the bolivians got for the coca leaves that the us company bought from
them.
I believe the Coca plant extract is covered under "Natural Flavors".
D.J.
2021-11-23 14:32:58 UTC
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Post by Maus
Post by Scott Lurndal
Post by Mike Spencer
When in was in jr. high school, my 90+ y.o. landlady called carbonated
drinks "phosphates". Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
Ingredients: Carbonated Water, High Fructose Corn Syrup,
Carmel Color, PHOSPHORIC ACID, Natural Flavors.
There may be other stuff in there. There was an argument fairly
recently between the Bolivian government and coca-cola about what what
the bolivians got for the coca leaves that the us company bought from
them.
I know after one of my retina surgeries, I was told to avoid caffeine.
So I selected a soda to drink that didn't list it. I kept getting
headaches.... the opthamalist told me I was drinking something with
caffeine in it. Then I saw on the tv that the Orange Fanta I was
drinking had caffeine in it, but it was below the amount that required
it to be in the ingredients list on the can.
--
Jim
Quadibloc
2021-11-26 03:41:51 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
The bottle of Coca-Cola in my refrigerator includes phosphoric acid
in its list of ingredients, so they're still using it, at least in Canada.

John Savard
J. Clarke
2021-11-26 05:48:48 UTC
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On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 19:41:51 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Mike Spencer
Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
The bottle of Coca-Cola in my refrigerator includes phosphoric acid
in its list of ingredients, so they're still using it, at least in Canada.
And in the US.
Post by Quadibloc
John Savard
Lawrence Statton (NK1G)
2021-11-26 16:23:44 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 19:41:51 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Mike Spencer
Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
The bottle of Coca-Cola in my refrigerator includes phosphoric acid
in its list of ingredients, so they're still using it, at least in Canada.
And in the US.
And in Mexico.

I'm not sure how the poster upthread came to the mistaken inference that
they ever *stopped* using phosphoric acid.

echo '***@abaluon.abaom' | sed s/aba/c/g
Mike Spencer
2021-11-26 23:47:04 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lawrence Statton (NK1G)
Post by J. Clarke
On Thu, 25 Nov 2021 19:41:51 -0800 (PST), Quadibloc
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Mike Spencer
Investigating the unfamiliar locution, I learned
that her generation had soft drinks containing phosphoric acid, an
ingredient that had by the 1950s been abandoned to avoid dissolving
teeth in Coke or whatever. And that the folkloric repute of Coke to
be a good rust remover depended on its *former* phosphoric acid
content.
The bottle of Coca-Cola in my refrigerator includes phosphoric acid
in its list of ingredients, so they're still using it, at least in Canada.
And in the US.
And in Mexico.
I'm not sure how the poster upthread...
That would be me.
Post by Lawrence Statton (NK1G)
... came to the mistaken inference that they ever *stopped* using
phosphoric acid.
In 1953, I was 11 years old when I first heard of "phosphates" from
someone 90+ years old. The information (apparently misinformation)
that phosphoric acid had been eliminated from Coke et al. sometime in
the preceding 20 or so years came from T.C. Mits [1], viz. adults
between 30 and 65 y.o. with no relevant scientrific or industrial
qualifications who were available for me to query.

As a teenager, I tried Coke as a remover of light rust on a chrome
bumper without success.

The matter of H2PO4 in beverages didn't come across my radar again
until circa 1990 when I read a pop can.


[1] The Celebrated Man in the Street
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Charlie Gibbs
2021-11-27 18:25:39 UTC
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Post by Mike Spencer
The matter of H2PO4 in beverages didn't come across my radar again
until circa 1990 when I read a pop can.
<nit>
s/H2PO4/H3PO4/
</nit>
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | Microsoft is a dictatorship.
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | Apple is a cult.
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | Linux is anarchy.
/ \ if you read it the right way. | Pick your poison.
Mike Spencer
2021-11-28 00:53:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by Charlie Gibbs
Post by Mike Spencer
The matter of H2PO4 in beverages didn't come across my radar again
until circa 1990 when I read a pop can.
<nit>
s/H2PO4/H3PO4/
</nit>
Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa. Cringe.

There's this: My undergrad degree in chemistry is 57 years old and
while the phosphate ion hasn't changed in that time, I have. :-)
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Joy Beeson
2021-11-28 04:23:50 UTC
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On 26 Nov 2021 19:47:04 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
In 1953, I was 11 years old when I first heard of "phosphates" from
someone 90+ years old.
In 1953 I was drinkig phosphates at Woolworth's lunch counter.

When I had a dime.

Or was it a nickel?
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at centurylink dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
Rich Alderson
2021-11-29 00:32:22 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
On 26 Nov 2021 19:47:04 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
In 1953, I was 11 years old when I first heard of "phosphates" from
someone 90+ years old.
In 1953 I was drinkig phosphates at Woolworth's lunch counter.
When I had a dime.
Or was it a nickel?
Probably a nickel; a nickel ($0.05 coin, for those not from North America)
would buy a bottle of Coca-Cola from a machine as late as 1960.
--
Rich Alderson ***@alderson.users.panix.com
Audendum est, et veritas investiganda; quam etiamsi non assequamur,
omnino tamen proprius, quam nunc sumus, ad eam perveniemus.
--Galen
Charlie Gibbs
2021-11-29 03:23:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Rich Alderson
Post by Joy Beeson
On 26 Nov 2021 19:47:04 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
In 1953, I was 11 years old when I first heard of "phosphates" from
someone 90+ years old.
In 1953 I was drinkig phosphates at Woolworth's lunch counter.
When I had a dime.
Or was it a nickel?
Probably a nickel; a nickel ($0.05 coin, for those not from North America)
would buy a bottle of Coca-Cola from a machine as late as 1960.
What's tough?
Life.
What's life?
A magazine.
How much does it cost?
It costs twenty cents.
But I only got a nickel (a nickel).
Ow, ow, that's tough.
-- Gabriel and the Angels

I only became aware of such things around 1960, and it was already
a dime around here by then.

And one thin dime won't even shine your shoes.
-- The Drifters: On Broadway
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | Microsoft is a dictatorship.
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | Apple is a cult.
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | Linux is anarchy.
/ \ if you read it the right way. | Pick your poison.
Scott Lurndal
2021-11-29 14:38:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 29 Nov 2021 03:23:43 GMT
Post by Charlie Gibbs
Post by Rich Alderson
Post by Joy Beeson
On 26 Nov 2021 19:47:04 -0400, Mike Spencer
Post by Mike Spencer
In 1953, I was 11 years old when I first heard of "phosphates"
from someone 90+ years old.
In 1953 I was drinkig phosphates at Woolworth's lunch counter.
When I had a dime.
Or was it a nickel?
Probably a nickel; a nickel ($0.05 coin, for those not from North
America) would buy a bottle of Coca-Cola from a machine as late as
1960.
What's tough?
Life.
What's life?
A magazine.
How much does it cost?
It costs twenty cents.
But I only got a nickel (a nickel).
Ow, ow, that's tough.
-- Gabriel and the Angels
I only became aware of such things around 1960, and it was already
a dime around here by then.
And one thin dime won't even shine your shoes.
-- The Drifters: On Broadway
How much for a shave & a haircut?
Two bits.

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