Discussion:
Computer books
Add Reply
gareth evans
2020-09-06 15:28:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
After being made aware of them here, I have ordered
the Abstracting book about Fortran, and the Computer
Engineering one about DEC.

This latter is available from Amazon.co.uk, but at £65
I've ordered a second hand one from Abebooks.co.uk (£25)
Bob Eager
2020-09-06 22:46:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
After being made aware of them here, I have ordered the Abstracting book
about Fortran, and the Computer Engineering one about DEC.
This latter is available from Amazon.co.uk, but at £65 I've ordered a
second hand one from Abebooks.co.uk (£25)
There are often copies on eBay.
--
Using UNIX since v6 (1975)...

Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
Peter Flass
2020-09-06 23:05:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bob Eager
After being made aware of them here, I have ordered the Abstracting book
about Fortran, and the Computer Engineering one about DEC.
This latter is available from Amazon.co.uk, but at £65 I've ordered a
second hand one from Abebooks.co.uk (£25)
There are often copies on eBay.
I just ordered the PB from Amazon for around $15
--
Pete
h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2020-09-08 18:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
1) IBM's Early computers by Bashe.

2) IBM's System/360 and early 370 by Pugh.

3) Building IBM by Pugh

4) Father, Son & Co by Tom Watson Jr

5) Dits to Bits by Herman Lukoff

6) (Memoir by former American President who took over IBM).

7) Up the Organization by Townsend
John Levine
2020-09-08 18:59:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
1) IBM's Early computers by Bashe.
2) IBM's System/360 and early 370 by Pugh.
3) Building IBM by Pugh
They're books by insiders written with the company's knowledge so I
presume there is some dirty laundry they skip, but they're very
informative and give a good feel for what it was like trying to get
things to work and shipped.
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
4) Father, Son & Co by Tom Watson Jr
Surprisingly good for a ghost-written autobiography.
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
6) (Memoir by former American President who took over IBM).
Uh, what? No such person.
--
Regards,
John Levine, ***@taugh.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies",
Please consider the environment before reading this e-mail. https://jl.ly
h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2020-09-08 19:22:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Levine
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
1) IBM's Early computers by Bashe.
2) IBM's System/360 and early 370 by Pugh.
3) Building IBM by Pugh
They're books by insiders written with the company's knowledge so I
presume there is some dirty laundry they skip, but they're very
informative and give a good feel for what it was like trying to get
things to work and shipped.
Yes, though the S/360 covers the defection of employees
and the screwup of Future System, I suspect there is dirty
laundry that is minimized. Also, I'm pretty sure they
imply IBM invented nearly everything and don't give
enough credit to others. For instance, who really
invented the wire-spring relay--IBM, Bell, or someone else?
IBM credits Bell for the transistor, but implies IBM
developed beyond a laboratory curiosity. They imply
they figured out how to make vacuum tubes suitable for
digital service and shared that with the tube makers.
The IBM books generally shy away from marketing.

The Bell Labs histories are very similar. Excellent
histories, but somewhat company centric.

The Watson memoir is very candid.
Post by John Levine
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
6) (Memoir by former American President who took over IBM).
Uh, what? No such person.
OOPS! That should be American EXPRESS. Sorry about that!
Guy was Louis V. Gerstner.

Loading...