Discussion:
Blinken lights making a comeback
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Dan Espen
2020-11-11 19:09:06 UTC
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Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.

I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.

Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.

I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.

For me, this seems pointless because the glass side of my case faces the
wall. Plus, I have just the amount of lighting I want with my new RGB
keyboard.

So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.

So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
--
Dan Espen
Dallas
2020-11-11 21:50:08 UTC
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Post by Dan Espen
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
Loading Image...

Achtung! Alles Lookenspeepers!

Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben.

Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken.

Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen.

Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das pockets muss; relaxen und
watchen das blinkenlights.
Dan Espen
2020-11-11 22:01:39 UTC
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Post by Dallas
Post by Dan Espen
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
https://i.imgur.com/ESq7NT2.jpeg
Achtung! Alles Lookenspeepers!
Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben.
Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken.
Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen.
Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das
pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlights.
Back in the day, that sign was in just about every computer room.
--
Dan Espen
Charlie Gibbs
2020-11-12 18:38:00 UTC
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Post by Dan Espen
Post by Dallas
Post by Dan Espen
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
https://i.imgur.com/ESq7NT2.jpeg
Achtung! Alles Lookenspeepers!
Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben.
Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken.
Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen.
Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das
pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlights.
Back in the day, that sign was in just about every computer room.
I still have one of the original IBM "THINK" signs.
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | "Some of you may die,
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | but it's sacrifice
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | I'm willing to make."
/ \ if you read it the right way. | -- Lord Farquaad (Shrek)
Michael LeVine
2020-11-12 00:10:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dallas
Post by Dan Espen
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
https://i.imgur.com/ESq7NT2.jpeg
Achtung! Alles Lookenspeepers!
Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben.
Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken.
Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen.
Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das
pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlights.
There is a German version

ATTENTION

This room is fullfilled mit special electronische equipment.
Fingergrabbing and pressing the cnoeppkes from the computers is
allowed for die experts only! So all the "lefthanders" stay
away and do not disturben the brainstorming von here working
intelligencies. Otherwise you will be out thrown and kicked
anderswhere! So:please keep still and only watchen astaunished
the blinkenlights.
--
Michael LeVine
***@redshift.com

Politics is the art of looking for trouble,
finding it everywhere,
diagnosing it incorrectly,
and applying the wrong remedies.
Groucho Marx
Michael LeVine
2020-11-12 00:13:10 UTC
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Post by Michael LeVine
Post by Dallas
Post by Dan Espen
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
https://i.imgur.com/ESq7NT2.jpeg
Achtung! Alles Lookenspeepers!
Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben.
Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken.
Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen.
Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das
pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlights.
There is a German version
ATTENTION
This room is fullfilled mit special electronische equipment.
Fingergrabbing and pressing the cnoeppkes from the computers is
allowed for die experts only! So all the "lefthanders" stay
away and do not disturben the brainstorming von here working
intelligencies. Otherwise you will be out thrown and kicked
anderswhere! So:please keep still and only watchen astaunished
the blinkenlights.
Also along teh same lines is

Warning
This machine is subject to breakdowns
during periods of critical need.
A special circuit in the machine called a critical detector
senses the operator's emotional state in terms of how
desperate he or she is to use the machine. The critical
detector then creates a malfunction proportional to the
desperation of the operator. Threatening the machine with
violence only aggravates the situation. Likewise attempts
to use another machine may cause it to also malfunction.
They belong to the same union. Keep cool and say nice
things to the machine.
--
Michael LeVine
***@redshift.com

Politics is the art of looking for trouble,
finding it everywhere,
diagnosing it incorrectly,
and applying the wrong remedies.
Groucho Marx
J. Clarke
2020-11-12 00:23:50 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2020 16:13:10 -0800, Michael LeVine
Post by Michael LeVine
Post by Michael LeVine
Post by Dallas
Post by Dan Espen
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
https://i.imgur.com/ESq7NT2.jpeg
Achtung! Alles Lookenspeepers!
Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben.
Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken.
Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen.
Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das
pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlights.
There is a German version
ATTENTION
This room is fullfilled mit special electronische equipment.
Fingergrabbing and pressing the cnoeppkes from the computers is
allowed for die experts only! So all the "lefthanders" stay
away and do not disturben the brainstorming von here working
intelligencies. Otherwise you will be out thrown and kicked
anderswhere! So:please keep still and only watchen astaunished
the blinkenlights.
Also along teh same lines is
Warning
This machine is subject to breakdowns
during periods of critical need.
A special circuit in the machine called a critical detector
senses the operator's emotional state in terms of how
desperate he or she is to use the machine. The critical
detector then creates a malfunction proportional to the
desperation of the operator. Threatening the machine with
violence only aggravates the situation. Likewise attempts
to use another machine may cause it to also malfunction.
They belong to the same union. Keep cool and say nice
things to the machine.
Friend of mine came up with a counter for that one. Had a big
sledghammer that he put in a case with a note "in case of emergency
break glass". His computer was very stable.
Dennis Boone
2020-11-12 03:57:42 UTC
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Post by Dan Espen
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel.
Spurious emissions what?

De
J. Clarke
2020-11-12 04:09:31 UTC
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Post by Dennis Boone
Post by Dan Espen
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel.
Spurious emissions what?
It's the second decade of the 21st century. Computers with windows
are a fixture and have been for a decade or more and have not been
shown to cause any kind of problem.
Joe Pfeiffer
2020-11-12 17:35:27 UTC
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Post by Dan Espen
So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.
That's almost enough to get me to replace my motherboard...
Dan Espen
2020-11-12 19:03:37 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Joe Pfeiffer
Post by Dan Espen
So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.
That's almost enough to get me to replace my motherboard...
I've been doing lots of research. I believe AMDs new processors are
worth the effort. I think I'm going with the 6 core Ryzen 5 5600X.
I really don't think I need the next step up with 8 cores.
I want some kind of X570 motherboard, I'm not 100% sure which one.
I also want to put one of those M.2 storage devices in it, they're
even faster than the SSDs I'm currently using.
Having USB-C will be nice but not 100% necessary, I back up to USB
sticks and it's slow but I do it overnight. So, I think the time
for an upgrade has come, but the lights inside the case, like I said,
even if I wanted more light in the office, the transparent side of
my case faces the wall, so any light in there is a waste for me.

In my travels I saw that you can also buy a small LED screen that
attaches to the motherboard and it shows system health statistics.
I believe that's to help over-clockers.
--
Dan Espen
Jorgen Grahn
2020-11-13 21:21:33 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?

/Jorgen
--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
J. Clarke
2020-11-13 22:16:30 UTC
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Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective for
some reason.
Robert Netzlof
2020-11-13 22:36:20 UTC
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Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective for
some reason.
I believe you are actually thinking of the little-known Dark Emitting Diode, once promoted for use in constructing portable photographic darkrooms. With the decline in film photography in favor of digital, darkrooms and thus the DED declined in popularity until today, both are practically unknown.
Jon Elson
2020-11-13 23:24:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Robert Netzlof
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective for
some reason.
I believe you are actually thinking of the little-known Dark Emitting
Diode, once promoted for use in constructing portable photographic
darkrooms. With the decline in film photography in favor of digital,
darkrooms and thus the DED declined in popularity until today, both are
practically unknown.
In the April issue of one of the old electronics magazines, a new
development was announced. By manufacturing LEDs and Darkness-Emitting
Arsenide Diodes on the same production line, 100% yield was achieved.
They let the reader come up with the acronym for this new device.

Jon
Charlie Gibbs
2020-11-14 00:21:16 UTC
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Post by Jon Elson
Post by Robert Netzlof
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective for
some reason.
I believe you are actually thinking of the little-known Dark Emitting
Diode, once promoted for use in constructing portable photographic
darkrooms. With the decline in film photography in favor of digital,
darkrooms and thus the DED declined in popularity until today, both are
practically unknown.
In the April issue of one of the old electronics magazines, a new
development was announced. By manufacturing LEDs and Darkness-Emitting
Arsenide Diodes on the same production line, 100% yield was achieved.
They let the reader come up with the acronym for this new device.
That must be what was in the all-black spaceship that Douglas Adams
described in _The Restaurant at the End of the Universe_:

"It's the wild colour scheme that freaks me," said Zaphod,
whose love affair with this ship had lasted almost three
minutes into the flight. "Every time you try to operate
one of these weird black controls that are labeled in black
on a black background, a little black light lights up black
to let you know you've done it. What is this? Some kind of
galactic hyperhearse?"

Elsewhere I once read a description of a Noise-Emitting Diode,
which would generate a loud (although brief) sound when you
hooked it up to 110 volts AC.
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | "Some of you may die,
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | but it's sacrifice
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | I'm willing to make."
/ \ if you read it the right way. | -- Lord Farquaad (Shrek)
J. Clarke
2020-11-14 00:56:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Charlie Gibbs
Post by Jon Elson
Post by Robert Netzlof
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective for
some reason.
I believe you are actually thinking of the little-known Dark Emitting
Diode, once promoted for use in constructing portable photographic
darkrooms. With the decline in film photography in favor of digital,
darkrooms and thus the DED declined in popularity until today, both are
practically unknown.
In the April issue of one of the old electronics magazines, a new
development was announced. By manufacturing LEDs and Darkness-Emitting
Arsenide Diodes on the same production line, 100% yield was achieved.
They let the reader come up with the acronym for this new device.
That must be what was in the all-black spaceship that Douglas Adams
"It's the wild colour scheme that freaks me," said Zaphod,
whose love affair with this ship had lasted almost three
minutes into the flight. "Every time you try to operate
one of these weird black controls that are labeled in black
on a black background, a little black light lights up black
to let you know you've done it. What is this? Some kind of
galactic hyperhearse?"
Elsewhere I once read a description of a Noise-Emitting Diode,
which would generate a loud (although brief) sound when you
hooked it up to 110 volts AC.
I've encountered a similar device, the Smoke-Emitting Diode, although
that can easily be confused for a device from which the Magic Smoke
had escaped--the subsequent behaviors are rather similar so it's an
easy mistake to make.
Thomas Koenig
2020-11-15 12:09:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jon Elson
In the April issue of one of the old electronics magazines, a new
development was announced. By manufacturing LEDs and Darkness-Emitting
Arsenide Diodes on the same production line, 100% yield was achieved.
They let the reader come up with the acronym for this new device.
A few decades ago, I remember seeing a paper copy of a paper copy
of ... an issue of National Lampoon, dedicated to computers.

They had stuff in it like a Roman processor (no dvide by zero, and
burn-in at the Nero facility), IBM going into the Timex Sinclar
market niche (features an optional CPU, and optional keyboard,
...), negative prices for chips, the logical "NEVER", "FOREVER"
and "NEITHER" functions, and much more.

Does anybody else remember that, and is there some source to get
this issue somewhere? I've looked, but didn't find it.
Michael LeVine
2020-11-15 12:17:37 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Thomas Koenig
Post by Jon Elson
In the April issue of one of the old electronics magazines, a new
development was announced. By manufacturing LEDs and Darkness-Emitting
Arsenide Diodes on the same production line, 100% yield was achieved.
They let the reader come up with the acronym for this new device.
A few decades ago, I remember seeing a paper copy of a paper copy
of ... an issue of National Lampoon, dedicated to computers.
They had stuff in it like a Roman processor (no dvide by zero, and
burn-in at the Nero facility), IBM going into the Timex Sinclar
market niche (features an optional CPU, and optional keyboard,
...), negative prices for chips, the logical "NEVER", "FOREVER"
and "NEITHER" functions, and much more.
Does anybody else remember that, and is there some source to get
this issue somewhere? I've looked, but didn't find it.
Don't forget the Signetics WOM

http://repeater-builder.com/molotora/gontor/25120-bw.pdf
--
Michael LeVine
***@redshift.com

Politics is the art of looking for trouble,
finding it everywhere,
diagnosing it incorrectly,
and applying the wrong remedies.
Groucho Marx
Charlie Gibbs
2020-11-15 18:03:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Thomas Koenig
Post by Jon Elson
In the April issue of one of the old electronics magazines, a new
development was announced. By manufacturing LEDs and Darkness-Emitting
Arsenide Diodes on the same production line, 100% yield was achieved.
They let the reader come up with the acronym for this new device.
A few decades ago, I remember seeing a paper copy of a paper copy
of ... an issue of National Lampoon, dedicated to computers.
They had stuff in it like a Roman processor (no dvide by zero, and
burn-in at the Nero facility), IBM going into the Timex Sinclar
market niche (features an optional CPU, and optional keyboard,
...), negative prices for chips, the logical "NEVER", "FOREVER"
and "NEITHER" functions, and much more.
Does anybody else remember that, and is there some source to get
this issue somewhere? I've looked, but didn't find it.
I don't remember seeing that one, although my days of reading
National Lampoon probably predated that issue.

One of my favourite logical operations was DON'T DO WHILE NOT.

I guess this will lead us back to those famous mainframe-era
lists of new instruction sets featuring instructions like

Rewind and Break Tape
Execute Operator
Branch on Blinking Indicator
Branch on Burned-Out Indicator
Forms Skip and Runaway
Why Immediate
Halt and Catch Fire (popular in Hollywood computers)

PBPBPBP - Place Backup in Plain Brown Paper Bag Please

Et cetera...
--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | "Some of you may die,
\ / <***@kltpzyxm.invalid> | but it's sacrifice
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | I'm willing to make."
/ \ if you read it the right way. | -- Lord Farquaad (Shrek)
Thomas Koenig
2020-11-15 18:16:26 UTC
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Post by Charlie Gibbs
One of my favourite logical operations was DON'T DO WHILE NOT.
That sounds roughly like the COND parameter in IBM's JCL.
Post by Charlie Gibbs
Rewind and Break Tape
Execute Operator
Branch on Blinking Indicator
Branch on Burned-Out Indicator
Forms Skip and Runaway
Why Immediate
Halt and Catch Fire (popular in Hollywood computers)
PBPBPBP - Place Backup in Plain Brown Paper Bag Please
http://www.csl.sri.com/users/mwfong/Humor/assembly.html

is probably close to the canonical list on that one... it has
quite some duplicates.
John Levine
2020-11-15 20:39:29 UTC
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Permalink
I have a 1966 edition of Faith, Hope, and Parity, which collected
funny bits from Datamation, the magazine that everyone in the industry
read. There's the adventures of the Kludge Komputer Korp, a piece on
the advantages of Pessium Programming (increased machine utilization
and less wasted idle time, with examples in 7090 assembler), and
Apiapt which is an Algol 60 implementation of A Partridge In A Pear
Tree.
--
Regards,
John Levine, ***@taugh.com, Primary Perpetrator of "The Internet for Dummies",
Please consider the environment before reading this e-mail. https://jl.ly
Dallas
2020-11-16 00:37:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Levine
I have a 1966 edition of Faith, Hope, and Parity, which collected
funny bits from Datamation, the magazine that everyone in the industry
read. There's the adventures of the Kludge Komputer Korp, a piece on
the advantages of Pessium Programming (increased machine utilization
and less wasted idle time, with examples in 7090 assembler), and
Apiapt which is an Algol 60 implementation of A Partridge In A Pear
Tree.
I liked the FORTRAN MAN comics

https://www.vintagecomputer.net/browse_thread.cfm?id=102
http://www.loopcntr.net/repository/1018.pdf (page 17)
Mike Spencer
2020-11-14 00:32:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robert Netzlof
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective
for some reason.
I believe you are actually thinking of the little-known Dark Emitting
Diode, once promoted for use in constructing portable photographic
darkrooms. With the decline in film photography in favor of digital,
darkrooms and thus the DED declined in popularity until today, both
are practically unknown.
Before the Dark Emitting Diode, the was heliotex, the crystalkanoogin
valve and the Hay field.

The Best of The Journal of Irreproducible Results, 1983 (original
pub. date unknown) pp. 180-1
---

DEFINITION OF A DARKBULB

Edited by Dr. George H. Scherr, Workman Publishing, New York

James L. DeLucas

The darkbulb is an electronic device thai produces darkness. It is
similar in appearance to the ordinary lightbulb. Whereas the lightbulb
is considered an energy source, the darkbulb could be considered an
energy sink.

The darkbulb looks like the ordinary lightbulb. It is much heavier, a
typical 60 watt bulb weighing about two pounds. The darkbulb's outer
shell is made of a special metallic material called heliotex. Heliotex
was made specially for the bulb, and it is necessary for the bulb's
operation. The bulb screws into an ordinary light socket and can be
run on house current. The bulbs are normally coated black for easy
identification. Darkbulbs come in power sizes similar to the
lightbulb. Two and three-way bulbs and special purpose bulbs are also
available.

The Hay Field

Unlike the simple heating filament of the lightbulb, the inner
contents of the darkbulb are complicated and electronic. The heart of
this device is the crystalkanoogin valve. The crystalkanoogin valve
was designed by Edison A. Thomas, an engineer at General Electric.
(See "An Inexpensive Dissipator of Radiant Energy," Electronics,
Vol. 42, No. 7, pp. 59-67, July 1970.) The valve is made up of a
series of miniature electronic components. The sole purpose of the
valve is the production of the Hay field.

The Hay Reverse Electromagnetic Field, or Hay (REF), was theoretically
proven to exist by R.E.F. Hay at MIT in late 1969. This invisible
field is able to dissipate normal electromagnetic energy, such as
light, by converting this energy into the reverse electromagnetic
energy of the Hay field. This energy conversion process is the means
by which the Hay field propagates through the air. In a vacuum the Hay
field would propagate indefinitely. In air, however, the Hay field
would lose energy to the surrounding medium and it would soon
disappear. Thus, the crystalkanoogin valve must continuously produce
the Hay field. Also, the Hay field will not propagate unless the
surrounding medium contains electromagnetic energy, since the Hay
field uses this energy to sustain itself.

The Hay field is analogous to a vacuum cleaner that sucks
electromagnetic energy from the air. Electromagnetic energy such as
light can be thought of as being absorbed by the darkbulb and then
converted into the Hay field. The recycling of the trapped light
energy not only solves the energy dissipation problem but also puts
this energy to useful work.

The crystalkanoogin valve sets up the Hay field on the inside surface
of the heliotex shell. The properties of the heliotex material cause
it to radiate the Hay field into the surrounding space, much like a
lightbulb would radiate light energy from the heating filament. The
heliotex shell thus acts as a radiating antenna for the Hay field. The
type of radiation absorbed by the bulb is dependent on the impurities
present in the heliotex shell. The impurities can be controlled during
the making of the heliotex. Thus, special purpose bulbs that absorb
only one kind of electromagnetic energy can be made. For instance, it
is possible to Create a darkbulb that absorbs only red light, or a
bulb that absorbs only cosmic rays.

During operation, the surface of the bulb will actually become cool
due to dissipation of heat from the heliotex material. The darkbulb
"sucks" light energy from the air, but the bulb is not a perfect
discriminator, and very small amounts of other forms of energy in the
vicinity of the bulb will also be dissipated. The bulb will become
cold because of a loss of heat energy to the field.

The ordinary darkbulb is one that will absorb light. The bulb will
dissipate light, that is, produce darkness in as large an area and to
as comparable a degree as a lightbulb of the same wattage will produce
light.

The Dark Fantastic

The ordinary darkbulb has many uses. A flip of the switch makes it
possible to sleep in the daytime

[ Image not available]
Sunlight streaming into a room inhibits sleep, but flipping on
the darkbulb envelops the subject in soothing darkness.

[Image not available]
Darkbulbs come in a variety of sizes, shapes, and wattages.

without the use of eyepatches. Photographic enthusiasts no longer need
to spend money "lightproofing" a darkroom. Just screw a darkbulb into
a socket and any room becomes an instant darkroom. Eye doctors have
found darkbulbs particularly useful for conducting eye
examinations. There are applications of the bulb in the scientific
fields, where many experiments require the absence of surrounding
radiant energy. The darkbulb also seems to be popular at parties.

Special purpose darkbulbs are finding wider applications. The special
purpose radio wave darkbulb will absorb radio waves from the
surrounding area. One application of this bulb is in the scientific
field where certain experiments require shielding from radio
waves. The cosmic and X-ray darkbulbs absorb cosmic energy and X-rays
from the air. These potentially hazardous forms of energy can now be
snatched from the air before they reach the vulnerable human being.
As scientific technology advances, the special purpose infrared
darkbulb will eventually be produced. Such a bulb would absorb
infrared (heat) energy. The invention of this type of darkbulb would
have a profound effect on modern society.

Refrigerators would no longer need a complex mechanical cooling
system -- just an infrared darkbulb inside. Sunbathers in the
vicinity of an infrared darkbulb could get a tan without worrying
about the harmful rays that cause sunburn. Air cooling could be
accomplished with a darkbulb. Unfortunately, technology has not found
a way to prevent the heliotex shell from becoming frozen solid during
the bulb's operation. In the frozen condition, the heliotex shell
fails to maintain the Hay field.

The darkbulb can be found in any store that carries lightbulbs. The
cost of this modern advance in technology has been considerably
reduced, although it is still much more expensive than the
lightbulb. However, the darkbulb is not beyond the reach of the
average-income American family. Indeed, they are becoming as common as
the home radio.
--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Jorgen Grahn
2020-11-13 22:51:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. Clarke
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
You could, but black LEDs are generally considered to be defective for
some reason.
But surely someone has put a blacklight in a computer case:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blacklight

/Jorgen
--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
Dan Espen
2020-11-13 23:54:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
All that paint is going to make a mess.

You can get an RGB keyboard (like mine), an RGB wrist pad for the
keyboard, an RGB mouse, an RGB pad for under the mouse, RGB speakers.

It can be quite a light show.
My office has XMAS lights running around the ceiling, one
desk lamp, and the glowing keyboard. Oh, yeah, forgot the glowing
speakers (not RGB, just color changing lights).

I'm sort of maxed out on glowing lights.
--
Dan Espen
Quadibloc
2020-11-14 04:22:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...

John Savard
Jorgen Grahn
2020-11-14 07:47:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...
I was joking, of course ... but I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color". OTOH I cannot easily come up with a
better one ... possibly "controllable colored light".

/Jorgen
--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
Dan Espen
2020-11-14 12:28:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...
I was joking, of course ... but I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color". OTOH I cannot easily come up with a
better one ... possibly "controllable colored light".
I think you just failed your first "create a marketing buzzword" test.
--
Dan Espen
Andy Burns
2020-11-14 12:38:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color".
Seen any brown LEDs?
Dan Espen
2020-11-14 13:19:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Jorgen Grahn
I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color".
Seen any brown LEDs?
Brown = #A52A2A

Looking at the color it's pretty much what I'd expect brown to be.
Perhaps "saddlebrown" is a little closer.

SaddleBrown=#8B4513

So, high on red, low on green and blue.
--
Dan Espen
Andy Burns
2020-11-14 13:22:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Jorgen Grahn
I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color".
Seen any brown LEDs?
Brown = #A52A2A
Looking at the color it's pretty much what I'd expect brown to be.
Perhaps "saddlebrown" is a little closer.
SaddleBrown=#8B4513
So, high on red, low on green and blue.
try shining it on something ...
Dan Espen
2020-11-14 17:26:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Jorgen Grahn
I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color".
Seen any brown LEDs?
Brown = #A52A2A
Looking at the color it's pretty much what I'd expect brown to be.
Perhaps "saddlebrown" is a little closer.
SaddleBrown=#8B4513
So, high on red, low on green and blue.
try shining it on something ...
I think I know where you're going with this, but I did shine it on
something. I started an xterm with:

xterm -bg brown
then
xterm -bg saddlebrown

In both cases I see light on my screen that looks brown.
Doesn't that count as "shining"?
--
Dan Espen
Andy Burns
2020-11-14 21:27:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Andy Burns
try shining it on something ...
I think I know where you're going with this, but I did shine it on
xterm -bg brown
then
xterm -bg saddlebrown
In both cases I see light on my screen that looks brown.
Doesn't that count as "shining"?
Well, it's 'through', rather than 'onto'
Dan Espen
2020-11-15 00:20:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Andy Burns
try shining it on something ...
I think I know where you're going with this, but I did shine it on
xterm -bg brown
then
xterm -bg saddlebrown
In both cases I see light on my screen that looks brown.
Doesn't that count as "shining"?
Well, it's 'through', rather than 'onto'
Well, there's probably an "onto" in there somewhere.
--
Dan Espen
J. Clarke
2020-11-14 17:37:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Andy Burns
Post by Jorgen Grahn
I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color".
Seen any brown LEDs?
Brown = #A52A2A
Looking at the color it's pretty much what I'd expect brown to be.
Perhaps "saddlebrown" is a little closer.
SaddleBrown=#8B4513
So, high on red, low on green and blue.
try shining it on something ...
I don't understand what you are trying to say here. Fill the OLED
screen on my phone with brown, and point it at something in the dark,
the something appears brown.
JimP
2020-11-14 18:03:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...
I was joking, of course ... but I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color". OTOH I cannot easily come up with a
better one ... possibly "controllable colored light".
/Jorgen
The Amiga computer had a RGB monitor, red-green-blue.
--
Jim
Jorgen Grahn
2020-11-14 22:03:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by JimP
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...
I was joking, of course ... but I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color". OTOH I cannot easily come up with a
better one ... possibly "controllable colored light".
/Jorgen
The Amiga computer had a RGB monitor, red-green-blue.
I meant to say it looked strange /in context/: I googled and found web
pages about "RGB computer cases".

I had never heard about this phenomenon before. I have obviously not
been paying attention. I went to a local store's page now, and decided
to look at desktop (non-tower) cases. The only hit was for a case
that was built into an actual desktop! (Lian Li DK-05F).

I also note that 241 cases out of 309 there were black, the most
impractical color for a piece of hardware.

/Jorgen
--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
Dave Garland
2020-11-15 03:30:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by JimP
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...
I was joking, of course ... but I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color". OTOH I cannot easily come up with a
better one ... possibly "controllable colored light".
/Jorgen
The Amiga computer had a RGB monitor, red-green-blue.
I meant to say it looked strange /in context/: I googled and found web
pages about "RGB computer cases".
I had never heard about this phenomenon before. I have obviously not
been paying attention. I went to a local store's page now, and decided
to look at desktop (non-tower) cases. The only hit was for a case
that was built into an actual desktop! (Lian Li DK-05F).
I also note that 241 cases out of 309 there were black, the most
impractical color for a piece of hardware.
Oh, come on. When I was a kid and interested in electronics (not
exactly pre-computer, but before transistors were common), me and my
friends knew that the way to identify the best (often surplus)
equipment was that it had a black crackle finish. But even today, the
3 towers in eyeshot of my desk have black cases. (Crackle, alas, seems
to have vanished, probably takes too long for the paint to set. Or
it's just out of fashion.) What's impractical?
Jorgen Grahn
2020-11-15 08:51:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...
Post by Dave Garland
Post by Jorgen Grahn
I had never heard about this phenomenon before. I have obviously not
been paying attention. I went to a local store's page now, and decided
to look at desktop (non-tower) cases. The only hit was for a case
that was built into an actual desktop! (Lian Li DK-05F).
I also note that 241 cases out of 309 there were black, the most
impractical color for a piece of hardware.
Oh, come on. When I was a kid and interested in electronics (not
exactly pre-computer, but before transistors were common), me and my
friends knew that the way to identify the best (often surplus)
equipment was that it had a black crackle finish. But even today, the
3 towers in eyeshot of my desk have black cases. (Crackle, alas, seems
to have vanished, probably takes too long for the paint to set. Or
it's just out of fashion.) What's impractical?
Hard to see the connectors and switches without a strong light.

It's worse with keyboards, though. I have an Apple Aluminium these
days, with white keys. A wonderful keyboard in every way (except for
non-standard keycodes -> extra configuration needed).

/Jorgen
--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
JimP
2020-11-15 20:02:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by JimP
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Quadibloc
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
Because it's built around light _emitting_ diodes, it is necessary to use
additive color mixing instead of subtractive color mixing. Now if you
instead used a white backlight, behind a three-layer liquid crystal panel
with a suitable design...
I was joking, of course ... but I /did/ find "RGB" a strange name for
the feature "can emit any color". OTOH I cannot easily come up with a
better one ... possibly "controllable colored light".
/Jorgen
The Amiga computer had a RGB monitor, red-green-blue.
I meant to say it looked strange /in context/: I googled and found web
pages about "RGB computer cases".
I had never heard about this phenomenon before. I have obviously not
been paying attention. I went to a local store's page now, and decided
to look at desktop (non-tower) cases. The only hit was for a case
that was built into an actual desktop! (Lian Li DK-05F).
I also note that 241 cases out of 309 there were black, the most
impractical color for a piece of hardware.
/Jorgen
Ah, I see now. You are talking about something Completely Different.
--
Jim
Joe Pfeiffer
2020-11-17 17:31:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jorgen Grahn
Post by Dan Espen
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
Why is it called RGB -- can you also get CMYK?
As opposed to a single-color or two-color LED.

Carlos E.R.
2020-11-14 19:02:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
For me, this seems pointless because the glass side of my case faces the
wall. Plus, I have just the amount of lighting I want with my new RGB
keyboard.
So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
I had a hard time locating a case without a glass side. I got one, but
it turned out huge.

As to the leds, there are boards with leds that do signal something
"real", and there are leds just for show, like those RGB things.

I also had some difficulty finding RAM modules without LEDs. Meaningless
LEDs, AFAIK, as they are controlled by a program.
--
Cheers, Carlos.
Dan Espen
2020-11-14 19:33:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Carlos E.R.
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
For me, this seems pointless because the glass side of my case faces the
wall. Plus, I have just the amount of lighting I want with my new RGB
keyboard.
So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
I had a hard time locating a case without a glass side. I got one, but
it turned out huge.
As to the leds, there are boards with leds that do signal something
"real", and there are leds just for show, like those RGB things.
I also had some difficulty finding RAM modules without
LEDs. Meaningless LEDs, AFAIK, as they are controlled by a program.
If a program can control the light and color, they can convey meaning.
When I got my clear sided case, it was new, at least to me.
Even if I had the case up at eye level, I wouldn't get to see much
of the RAM if it had LEDs. I'm still trying to nail down the best RAM
sticks for the motherboard I want. For the newest Ryzen CPUs they're
reporting that 4 RAM sticks work better than 2. That seems logical to
me but apparently, that wasn't always the case.
--
Dan Espen
Carlos E.R.
2020-11-14 20:19:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Carlos E.R.
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
For me, this seems pointless because the glass side of my case faces the
wall. Plus, I have just the amount of lighting I want with my new RGB
keyboard.
So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
I had a hard time locating a case without a glass side. I got one, but
it turned out huge.
As to the leds, there are boards with leds that do signal something
"real", and there are leds just for show, like those RGB things.
I also had some difficulty finding RAM modules without
LEDs. Meaningless LEDs, AFAIK, as they are controlled by a program.
If a program can control the light and color, they can convey meaning.
Yes, but it is convoluted, not what the original computer lights were
for. They were tied to hardware. Firmware at most. My previous
motherboard had a lot of them, and the manual had a list of the
conditions they would signal. Error conditions were of interest.
Post by Dan Espen
When I got my clear sided case, it was new, at least to me.
Even if I had the case up at eye level, I wouldn't get to see much
of the RAM if it had LEDs. I'm still trying to nail down the best RAM
sticks for the motherboard I want. For the newest Ryzen CPUs they're
reporting that 4 RAM sticks work better than 2. That seems logical to
me but apparently, that wasn't always the case.
Didn't know that.
--
Cheers, Carlos.
Dan Espen
2020-11-14 21:27:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Carlos E.R.
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Carlos E.R.
Post by Dan Espen
Many years ago I posted here that I missed all the blinking lights on
computer consoles.
I'm trying to pick out a new desktop motherboard and I see that the
lights are back, in spades.
Not exactly blinking lights, but they are lights, they can blink, and
they can indicate system condition.
I want to put a new motherboard in my existing case which has a glass
side panel. Most of the motherboards now come with RGB. In short,
there are colored LEDs all around the board and the fans and they change
color under computer control.
For me, this seems pointless because the glass side of my case faces the
wall. Plus, I have just the amount of lighting I want with my new RGB
keyboard.
So, I looked at a bunch of boards and found the MSI X570 PRO-A, no
lights but otherwise everything I wanted. Today I'm reading the specs
and it doesn't appear to have any lights but there are multiple sockets
on the board to control RGB devices.
So, it looks like the blinking lights are back.
I had a hard time locating a case without a glass side. I got one, but
it turned out huge.
As to the leds, there are boards with leds that do signal something
"real", and there are leds just for show, like those RGB things.
I also had some difficulty finding RAM modules without
LEDs. Meaningless LEDs, AFAIK, as they are controlled by a program.
If a program can control the light and color, they can convey
meaning.
Yes, but it is convoluted, not what the original computer lights were
for. They were tied to hardware. Firmware at most. My previous
motherboard had a lot of them, and the manual had a list of the
conditions they would signal. Error conditions were of interest.
The motherboard I'm looking at has a set of lights that can be
used to diagnose boot problems. I think the primary purpose of these
RGB lights is the light show. Actually, that was usually the same
purpose they served way back when.
Post by Carlos E.R.
Post by Dan Espen
When I got my clear sided case, it was new, at least to me.
Even if I had the case up at eye level, I wouldn't get to see much
of the RAM if it had LEDs. I'm still trying to nail down the best RAM
sticks for the motherboard I want. For the newest Ryzen CPUs they're
reporting that 4 RAM sticks work better than 2. That seems logical to
me but apparently, that wasn't always the case.
Didn't know that.
Based on my limited knowledge which mostly comes from Youtube, this
was something reviewers discovered and so far, hasn't been backed up
by the manufacturers.

Here's one of the many videos on the subject:


--
Dan Espen
Quadibloc
2020-11-15 01:16:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Carlos E.R.
Post by Dan Espen
Even if I had the case up at eye level, I wouldn't get to see much
of the RAM if it had LEDs. I'm still trying to nail down the best RAM
sticks for the motherboard I want. For the newest Ryzen CPUs they're
reporting that 4 RAM sticks work better than 2. That seems logical to
me but apparently, that wasn't always the case.
Didn't know that.
Based on my limited knowledge which mostly comes from Youtube, this
was something reviewers discovered and so far, hasn't been backed up
by the manufacturers.
All right, if that's true, that's _really_ odd. Because the new Ryzen chips still
fit on the same motherboards as the old ones. And those motherboards can
only handle a dual-channel path to memory.

For a Threadripper, which is quad channel, of course four RAM sticks would work
better than two - they would be twice as fast, since they would all be going at
once.

John Savard
Scott Lurndal
2020-11-14 22:31:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Carlos E.R.
I also had some difficulty finding RAM modules without
LEDs. Meaningless LEDs, AFAIK, as they are controlled by a program.
If a program can control the light and color, they can convey meaning.
When I got my clear sided case, it was new, at least to me.
Even if I had the case up at eye level, I wouldn't get to see much
of the RAM if it had LEDs. I'm still trying to nail down the best RAM
sticks for the motherboard I want. For the newest Ryzen CPUs they're
reporting that 4 RAM sticks work better than 2. That seems logical to
me but apparently, that wasn't always the case.
It depends on how many DRAM controllers (channel) that they have on-board. One
DIMM per channel is optimal, as there is no need to share the channel
bandwidth between multiple DIMMs.

Older systems often had two or four dimm slots per controller,
with more than one dimm on a controller, the DRAM transfer rate would
be impacted adversely.

High-end Ryzen server chips have four or six DRAM controllers.
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