Discussion:
The ELLIOTT 503
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s***@hotmail.com
2020-05-31 08:52:54 UTC
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I used to program the Elliott 503s at the BT computer centre in Gresham St.
The Algol programs were on 8-track paper tape via 1000 char/sec readers.
I used the Elliott simulation package for an economic model of local cable provisioning.
At one time I had a printout of a complete memory dump and was able to identify my program routines and where all the variables and constants were stored. mnemonic codes 20, 30 and 24 are still etched in my brain!
Bob Eager
2020-05-31 11:36:54 UTC
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Post by s***@hotmail.com
I used to program the Elliott 503s at the BT computer centre in Gresham St.
The Algol programs were on 8-track paper tape via 1000 char/sec readers.
I used the Elliott simulation package for an economic model of local cable provisioning.
At one time I had a printout of a complete memory dump and was able to
identify my program routines and where all the variables and constants
were stored. mnemonic codes 20, 30 and 24 are still etched in my brain!
Not much about the 503 directly, but you might find this interesting.

https://computerconservationsociety.org/resurrection.htm
--
Using UNIX since v6 (1975)...

Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
http://www.mirrorservice.org
Eric vdM
2020-06-01 06:55:47 UTC
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Post by s***@hotmail.com
I used to program the Elliott 503s at the BT computer centre in Gresham St.
The Algol programs were on 8-track paper tape via 1000 char/sec readers.
I used the Elliott simulation package for an economic model of local cable provisioning.
At one time I had a printout of a complete memory dump and was able to identify my program routines and where all the variables and constants were stored. mnemonic codes 20, 30 and 24 are still etched in my brain!
Reviving a twenty year old thread. Wow.

The beauty of systems like the Elliott was that it was possible to understand all of the hardware and part of the software. And remember all 64 of its functions codes, in octal.
You may be interested in having a look at some of the manuals for the Elliott 503. They can be found at Bill Purvis's site: <http://www.billp.org/ccs/503/index.html>

Eric van der Meer
Quadibloc
2020-06-01 16:01:36 UTC
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Post by Eric vdM
Reviving a twenty year old thread. Wow.
I had done some searching, and found that the Elliott 503 was a British design;
there had been another computer which was a renamed RCA machine.

Just now, I noticed that the Elliott 503 has another claim to fame; it was the
computer that used Cluff-Foster-Idelson code, which was the first computer code
to have a general arrangement of characters similar to what would later be used
in ASCII (although it was definitely very different from ASCII in a number of
ways).

John Savard

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