Discussion:
Info about Henry S. Warren Jr.
(too old to reply)
Thomas Koenig
2021-08-26 05:51:04 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

I'd like to update the Wikipedia article on Hacker's Delight a
little bit, and I find litte information about the author except
that he seems to have worked at IBM for a long time.

Does anybody have a pointer to a short biography or some more info?

(I think this book qualifies as folklore, especially the "lore"
part :-)
Andreas Kohlbach
2021-08-26 16:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Koenig
I'd like to update the Wikipedia article on Hacker's Delight a
little bit, and I find litte information about the author except
that he seems to have worked at IBM for a long time.
Suppose you found <https://www.chessprogramming.org/Henry_S._Warren,_Jr.>
already?
Post by Thomas Koenig
Does anybody have a pointer to a short biography or some more info?
I also find a snipped in Google Books at
<https://books.google.ca/books/about/Hacker_s_Delight.html?id=iBNKMspIlqEC&redir_esc=y>. Not
sure if this is helpful.
--
Andreas
Thomas Koenig
2021-08-29 12:00:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andreas Kohlbach
Post by Thomas Koenig
I'd like to update the Wikipedia article on Hacker's Delight a
little bit, and I find litte information about the author except
that he seems to have worked at IBM for a long time.
Suppose you found <https://www.chessprogramming.org/Henry_S._Warren,_Jr.>
already?
That page is currently empty, but it certainly makes sense for all
the bit-twiddling hacks in the book to be used in chess programming.
Post by Andreas Kohlbach
Post by Thomas Koenig
Does anybody have a pointer to a short biography or some more info?
I also find a snipped in Google Books at
<https://books.google.ca/books/about/Hacker_s_Delight.html?id=iBNKMspIlqEC&redir_esc=y>. Not
sure if this is helpful.
It is, thanks!

So he worked for IBM on computers from the 704 to PowerPC. He has
certainly seen a lot of change...

What I found also interesting is the scathing remarks he put
in "Hacker's Delight" about the S/360 floating point format.
Factually, these are correct, but it certainly feels like he was
repeating an argument he had made at the time, and the decision
went the other way (as we all know).

Anyway, I did update the article, so people can get a general idea
of what the book is about (and not buy it and think they will get
fast algorithms for database access, or a guide how to break into
computer systems).
Andreas Kohlbach
2021-08-29 15:40:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Koenig
Post by Andreas Kohlbach
Post by Thomas Koenig
I'd like to update the Wikipedia article on Hacker's Delight a
little bit, and I find litte information about the author except
that he seems to have worked at IBM for a long time.
Suppose you found <https://www.chessprogramming.org/Henry_S._Warren,_Jr.>
already?
That page is currently empty, but it certainly makes sense for all
the bit-twiddling hacks in the book to be used in chess programming.
Not empty here. The first (among several more) paragraph says:

| Henry S. (Hank) Warren, Jr., an American computer scientist and IBM
| research fellow, best known as author of Hacker's Delight, a
| groundbreaking book on all the programming tricks and bit-twiddling,
| which also influenced chess programming, especially in manipulating
| bitboards. Hank received his Ph.D. in computer science from the
| Courant Institute at New York University. Since 1973 he has been with
| IBM's Research Division, focusing on compilers and computer
| architectures. He currently works on the Blue Gene ^[1] petaflop
| computer project

[...]
Post by Thomas Koenig
Anyway, I did update the article, so people can get a general idea
of what the book is about (and not buy it and think they will get
fast algorithms for database access, or a guide how to break into
computer systems).
Thanks.
--
Andreas
Thomas Koenig
2021-08-29 16:59:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Koenig
Post by Andreas Kohlbach
Post by Thomas Koenig
I'd like to update the Wikipedia article on Hacker's Delight a
little bit, and I find litte information about the author except
that he seems to have worked at IBM for a long time.
Suppose you found <https://www.chessprogramming.org/Henry_S._Warren,_Jr.>
already?
That page is currently empty, but it certainly makes sense for all
the bit-twiddling hacks in the book to be used in chess programming.
Ah, the trailing dot was stripped from the URL. That explains it :-)
Loading...