Discussion:
Infoworld Jun 13, 1983
(too old to reply)
Scott Lurndal
2020-04-18 16:49:05 UTC
Permalink
Interesting article on the NCC in Anaheim. Interesting quotes:

"On a sweltering, smog-ridden Southern California Morning, a
vicious Santa Ana wind swept out of the hills, cleared the
sky and revealed the hidden mountains surrounding Anaheim"
[nasty stuff, that smog. Good work by the CARB and SCAQMD
to clean it up by the mid 90's]

"If the wind didn't excite the showgoers, they surely didn't
find much at this year's NCC that was more interesting except
possibly the irritation that many exhibitors displayed towards
the Japanese, who were there in force taking pictures of
everything they could see."

"Microsoft was stuck in the outdoor tents where there
was no air conditioning. Someone suggested that the makeshift
structure would be better for growing marijuana than anything
else. It was hot and oppressive."

"Apple was showing off its proprietary AppleNet LAN, hooking together
a number of Lisa personal computers for the first time."

"The Lisa fit right into the metaphor of the desktop that Apple
is heavily promoting. After writing a letter, the letter is
addressed and stuck into an envelope - 'The mouse licks the envelope'
said one of the Apple exhibitors - and then placed into an out-basket
to be 'mailed' to another Lisa on the network."

"We also wonder if Apple isn't carrying the desktop metaphor too far
in the lisa, after all aren't we trying to replace the current antiquated
office practices that involve such things as licking envelopes?"

"The most outrageous was the 380 megabyte 5 1/4 inch Winchestor from
Maxtor, which is located in San Jose, California. Imagine having to
use nearly 1000 floppies to back up the beast."


[source: google books]
JimP
2020-04-18 19:21:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Scott Lurndal
"On a sweltering, smog-ridden Southern California Morning, a
vicious Santa Ana wind swept out of the hills, cleared the
sky and revealed the hidden mountains surrounding Anaheim"
[nasty stuff, that smog. Good work by the CARB and SCAQMD
to clean it up by the mid 90's]
"If the wind didn't excite the showgoers, they surely didn't
find much at this year's NCC that was more interesting except
possibly the irritation that many exhibitors displayed towards
the Japanese, who were there in force taking pictures of
everything they could see."
"Microsoft was stuck in the outdoor tents where there
was no air conditioning. Someone suggested that the makeshift
structure would be better for growing marijuana than anything
else. It was hot and oppressive."
"Apple was showing off its proprietary AppleNet LAN, hooking together
a number of Lisa personal computers for the first time."
"The Lisa fit right into the metaphor of the desktop that Apple
is heavily promoting. After writing a letter, the letter is
addressed and stuck into an envelope - 'The mouse licks the envelope'
said one of the Apple exhibitors - and then placed into an out-basket
to be 'mailed' to another Lisa on the network."
"We also wonder if Apple isn't carrying the desktop metaphor too far
in the lisa, after all aren't we trying to replace the current antiquated
office practices that involve such things as licking envelopes?"
"The most outrageous was the 380 megabyte 5 1/4 inch Winchestor from
Maxtor, which is located in San Jose, California. Imagine having to
use nearly 1000 floppies to back up the beast."
[source: google books]
I was told, back in the late 1980s, that such things was to assuage
the fears people had towards computers.

I encountered several people who had taken movies like 'The Forbin
Project' seriously. One time I was trying to help someone so I ran my
fingers across the keyboard to show them they had nothing to fear.

That person freaked out and told me I would upset the computer. I
pointed out it couldn't think like a person. They were not calmed
down.

First hard drive I enountered was a 10 megabyte on in a Tandy SX 1000.
A hard drive built into a computer card. The computer had 512 megs of
ram, and two floppy drives. Seems Lotus 1-2-3 required a program disk
and a data disk to write to. Both 5.25 inch floppies. The computer
was an XT compatible clone. The computer came with 256 megs of ram,
complete they claimed. But nothing at the university would run in 256
megs of ram, so my boss had to buy more... and discovered we had to
use Tandy SX 1000 memory, nothing else would work.
--
Jim
t***@gmail.com
2020-04-18 20:45:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by JimP
Post by Scott Lurndal
"On a sweltering, smog-ridden Southern California Morning, a
vicious Santa Ana wind swept out of the hills, cleared the
sky and revealed the hidden mountains surrounding Anaheim"
[nasty stuff, that smog. Good work by the CARB and SCAQMD
to clean it up by the mid 90's]
"If the wind didn't excite the showgoers, they surely didn't
find much at this year's NCC that was more interesting except
possibly the irritation that many exhibitors displayed towards
the Japanese, who were there in force taking pictures of
everything they could see."
"Microsoft was stuck in the outdoor tents where there
was no air conditioning. Someone suggested that the makeshift
structure would be better for growing marijuana than anything
else. It was hot and oppressive."
"Apple was showing off its proprietary AppleNet LAN, hooking together
a number of Lisa personal computers for the first time."
"The Lisa fit right into the metaphor of the desktop that Apple
is heavily promoting. After writing a letter, the letter is
addressed and stuck into an envelope - 'The mouse licks the envelope'
said one of the Apple exhibitors - and then placed into an out-basket
to be 'mailed' to another Lisa on the network."
"We also wonder if Apple isn't carrying the desktop metaphor too far
in the lisa, after all aren't we trying to replace the current antiquated
office practices that involve such things as licking envelopes?"
"The most outrageous was the 380 megabyte 5 1/4 inch Winchestor from
Maxtor, which is located in San Jose, California. Imagine having to
use nearly 1000 floppies to back up the beast."
[source: google books]
I was told, back in the late 1980s, that such things was to assuage
the fears people had towards computers.
I encountered several people who had taken movies like 'The Forbin
Project' seriously. One time I was trying to help someone so I ran my
fingers across the keyboard to show them they had nothing to fear.
That person freaked out and told me I would upset the computer. I
pointed out it couldn't think like a person. They were not calmed
down.
First hard drive I enountered was a 10 megabyte on in a Tandy SX 1000.
A hard drive built into a computer card. The computer had 512 megs of
ram, and two floppy drives. Seems Lotus 1-2-3 required a program disk
and a data disk to write to. Both 5.25 inch floppies. The computer
was an XT compatible clone. The computer came with 256 megs of ram,
complete they claimed. But nothing at the university would run in 256
megs of ram, so my boss had to buy more... and discovered we had to
use Tandy SX 1000 memory, nothing else would work.
--
Jim
I think you meant 256K & 512K of memory.
- Tim
JimP
2020-04-19 16:18:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by JimP
Post by Scott Lurndal
"On a sweltering, smog-ridden Southern California Morning, a
vicious Santa Ana wind swept out of the hills, cleared the
sky and revealed the hidden mountains surrounding Anaheim"
[nasty stuff, that smog. Good work by the CARB and SCAQMD
to clean it up by the mid 90's]
"If the wind didn't excite the showgoers, they surely didn't
find much at this year's NCC that was more interesting except
possibly the irritation that many exhibitors displayed towards
the Japanese, who were there in force taking pictures of
everything they could see."
"Microsoft was stuck in the outdoor tents where there
was no air conditioning. Someone suggested that the makeshift
structure would be better for growing marijuana than anything
else. It was hot and oppressive."
"Apple was showing off its proprietary AppleNet LAN, hooking together
a number of Lisa personal computers for the first time."
"The Lisa fit right into the metaphor of the desktop that Apple
is heavily promoting. After writing a letter, the letter is
addressed and stuck into an envelope - 'The mouse licks the envelope'
said one of the Apple exhibitors - and then placed into an out-basket
to be 'mailed' to another Lisa on the network."
"We also wonder if Apple isn't carrying the desktop metaphor too far
in the lisa, after all aren't we trying to replace the current antiquated
office practices that involve such things as licking envelopes?"
"The most outrageous was the 380 megabyte 5 1/4 inch Winchestor from
Maxtor, which is located in San Jose, California. Imagine having to
use nearly 1000 floppies to back up the beast."
[source: google books]
I was told, back in the late 1980s, that such things was to assuage
the fears people had towards computers.
I encountered several people who had taken movies like 'The Forbin
Project' seriously. One time I was trying to help someone so I ran my
fingers across the keyboard to show them they had nothing to fear.
That person freaked out and told me I would upset the computer. I
pointed out it couldn't think like a person. They were not calmed
down.
First hard drive I enountered was a 10 megabyte on in a Tandy SX 1000.
A hard drive built into a computer card. The computer had 512 megs of
ram, and two floppy drives. Seems Lotus 1-2-3 required a program disk
and a data disk to write to. Both 5.25 inch floppies. The computer
was an XT compatible clone. The computer came with 256 megs of ram,
complete they claimed. But nothing at the university would run in 256
megs of ram, so my boss had to buy more... and discovered we had to
use Tandy SX 1000 memory, nothing else would work.
--
Jim
I think you meant 256K & 512K of memory.
- Tim
Yeah, kilobytes.
--
Jim
Peter Flass
2020-04-19 17:47:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@gmail.com
... But nothing at the university would run in 256
megs of ram, so my boss had to buy more... and discovered we had to
use Tandy SX 1000 memory, nothing else would work.
I think you meant 256K & 512K of memory.
Pretty soon we’ll be saying GB when we mean MB in talking about older
(i.e.today’s) equipment.
--
Pete
JimP
2020-04-20 15:55:47 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 19 Apr 2020 10:47:45 -0700, Peter Flass
Post by t***@gmail.com
... But nothing at the university would run in 256
megs of ram, so my boss had to buy more... and discovered we had to
use Tandy SX 1000 memory, nothing else would work.
I think you meant 256K & 512K of memory.
Pretty soon we’ll be saying GB when we mean MB in talking about older
(i.e.today’s) equipment.
Not that I trust wikipedia, but this seems accurate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tandy_1000
--
Jim
Loading...