Discussion:
Becoming a dinosaur
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Gareth Evans
2020-04-19 12:57:47 UTC
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Time was when if you knew one end of a computer
to another then you'd be recruited to program any
application or system software even if outside
any of your previous experiences.

Nowadays, unless you have an exact match for
application, language, OS and processor you
don't get a look in.

HR dept interference?
Jorgen Grahn
2020-04-19 14:55:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gareth Evans
Time was when if you knew one end of a computer
to another then you'd be recruited to program any
application or system software even if outside
any of your previous experiences.
Nowadays, unless you have an exact match for
application, language, OS and processor you
don't get a look in.
HR dept interference?
For language and OS that makes sense: you don't want a Javascript
programmer in a C project. And mixing Windows and Unix people means
certain kinds of problems. As for processors, I don't think anyone
ever asked me about those.

This doesn't mean you become a dinosaur. Not adapting to changes
means you are one already. Like me for example -- but I hope the
Cretaceous doesn't end before I retire.

/Jorgen
--
// Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
\X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
m***@gmail.com
2020-04-19 16:36:17 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, April 19, 2020 at 7:55:14 AM UTC-7, Jorgen Grahn wrote:
# [...] I hope the Cretaceous doesn't end before I retire.

Because MindForth has always been released publicly since its inception around 1998, there are copies of MindForth floating around and lying dormant on obsolescent computers all across computerdom. Each latent, dormant copy of MindForth is potentially a ReIgnition of the flame of AI evolution. MindForth could fade from the scene for decades and suddenly reappear when some Prometheus rediscovers the source code and tweaks it into EvoViability.

Not only could a moribund MindForth come back to life from a junkyard computer harboring its metastatic source code, but an even more likely scenario of disruptive evolution could emerge from any closely held AI CryptoLab that has latched onto a mature form of MindForth and accelerated its evolution by throwing money and manpower at it. The very threat that some organization may be developing MindForth in competitive secrecy is enough to warn corporate entities of the dangers of being left behind in the AI Minds Race.

http://ai.neocities.org/AiEvolution.html
Ahem A Rivet's Shot
2020-04-19 18:11:46 UTC
Permalink
On 19 Apr 2020 14:55:12 GMT
Post by Jorgen Grahn
For language and OS that makes sense: you don't want a Javascript
programmer in a C project.
It is amazing how many times it has been useful that I can switch
tracks between a number of disciplines quite easily, I'm primarily a
back-end unix developer C, C++, Python, Perl ... but I can work in the
enterprise Java mindset as well as HTML/CSS/JavaScript although I prefer to
leave that to folks with more artistic inclinations (I can make it work,
making it pretty often irritates or eludes me).
Post by Jorgen Grahn
And mixing Windows and Unix people means certain kinds of problems.
Ah well yes - I don't do Windows and never have, which means if the
project requires Windows as well as Unix and I'm involved then there will
be Windows and Unix people on the project - this has happened on a couple
of projects, it never caused problems.
Post by Jorgen Grahn
As for processors, I don't think anyone ever asked me about those.
Not in decades - and then it was "Z80 or 6502 ?" - "Both, more Z80
though".
--
Steve O'Hara-Smith | Directable Mirror Arrays
C:\>WIN | A better way to focus the sun
The computer obeys and wins. | licences available see
You lose and Bill collects. | http://www.sohara.org/
JimP
2020-04-19 16:23:37 UTC
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On Sun, 19 Apr 2020 13:57:47 +0100, Gareth Evans
Post by Gareth Evans
Time was when if you knew one end of a computer
to another then you'd be recruited to program any
application or system software even if outside
any of your previous experiences.
Nowadays, unless you have an exact match for
application, language, OS and processor you
don't get a look in.
HR dept interference?
The few times I publically posted my resume, I got lots of job offers
for doing things I knew nothing about. And in several cases, had never
heard of.

I replied to some of the emails. One apologized, two hemmed and hawed,
and one was absolutely certain they had found their match in a
prospective employee. I turned all of them down.
--
Jim
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